Phase 1 of Madison citywide Wi-Fi network goes live

Madison, Wisconsin’s citywide Wi-Fi network is going live, at least Phase 1 which includes, the airport, downtown, near east and near west sides, and neighborhoods along the South Park Street corridor on Madison’s south side (view map here). If all goes well, the network will expand to cover the city.Madison, Wisconsin’s citywide Wi-Fi network is going live, at least Phase 1 which includes, the airport, downtown, near east and near west sides, and neighborhoods along the South Park Street corridor on Madison’s south side (view map here). If all goes well, the network will expand to cover the city.

To find out more, go to the Mad City Broadband website:

www.madcitybroadband.com

The city has hired CellNet to deploy the network (AOL, the original bid winner, withdrew last year). CellNet owns and operates the network (but does not deliver service to end users). It’s not an ISP — Cellnet provides fixed-network data communication systems and automation solutions to the utility industry. It is based in Atlanta, Georgia, and it supplies gas, water, and electric utilities with networks that enable them to communicate with residential and commercial and industrial (C&I) endpoints for applications such as automated meter reading (AMR), distribution automation (DA), and SCADA. Interesting that such a company is getting into this space.
CellNet installed 150 Cisco nodes (more to be installed later as the network expands) to provide connectivity. CellNet is also negotiating with Waukesha, Wisconsin for a citywide network there.

The city is following the wholesale model and is currently working with two ISPs who will be delivering service: Merrimac Communications and ResTech Services, both based in Madison.

Read the press release here.

Comments

  1. […] While most of the mainstream media focus on large players like EarthLink and their partnerships with companies like Google in places like San Francisco, it’s actually in smaller cities like Tempe, Corpus Christi, St. Cloud and Addison that progress is being made, with the help of local service providers such as Neoreach and Red Moon Broadband or unlikely partners such as Northrop-Grumman (Corpus Christi) and HP (St. Cloud). Even more unlikely partners have surfaced recently in the form of Chevron (Burleson, Texas) and Cellnet (Madison, Wisconsin). But this is what makes muni wireless so interesting and dynamic: it’s new so people try out different configurations, business models and partnerships, and they try to figure out how city or countywide networks can serve so many different types of users (municipal, business, utility, residential, public safety). […]