WiMAX cooperative launched in Nashville, Tennessee

Here’s something interesting: a WiMAX cooperative. WiMAXCoop (www.wimaxcoop.com) has been launched in Nashville, Tennessee. John Bransford, the founder, says it could be a revolutionary mechanism through which consumers can band together and purchase broadband and related services en masse in order to better provide for them and meet their overall communication and information needs. Of course cooperatives are nothing newHere’s something interesting: a WiMAX cooperative. WiMAXCoop (www.wimaxcoop.com) has been launched in Nashville, Tennessee. John Bransford, the founder, says it could be a revolutionary mechanism through which consumers can band together and purchase broadband and related services en masse in order to better provide for them and meet their overall communication and information needs. Of course cooperatives are nothing new — they’ve been around since the days farmers used to get together to purchase fertilizer. But this one is interesting and could give other communities ideas on how to organize “group buying” of telecoms services.

“The economics are compelling‚Äö?Ñ? says Bransford “consider what you have to go through to offer a wired service to an area with a radius of 15 to 30 miles or hundreds of square miles with all the necessary telephone poles or underground conduits, physical wires etc. We want everyone to have access to broadband without physical or legal hindrance, and we mean everyone.‚Äö?Ñ?

Bransford continues “The ISPs will claim that historically, Nashville has been adequately served, claiming 90% DSL coverage. But that means 10% CAN’T access it and that’s too much. In fact, just one person or business who would like broadband but is prevented from connecting, is one potential customer too many. Why are we allowing our city’s growth to be stifled like this? The UK, France, Germany and even Korea are rolling out substantial wireless broadband networks, so why are we lagging behind?‚Äö?Ñ?

Bransford believes empowering businesses and individuals alike to band together as co-operatives and finance their own WiMAX services will ensure that potentially nobody will be left behind by the reluctance of existing ISPs to provide an in-demand service where they deem it uneconomical to do so. If the Nashville model works then there is no reason why similar schemes cannot be introduced in other areas of the country experiencing similar provision problems.

WiMAXCoop invites all businesses and individuals to register their interest by visiting their website at www.wimaxcoop.com where they will find information on the formation of co-operatives and also be able to meet and discuss the project.

Bransford may be on to something. But if he’s too successful, he may find the incumbents trying to get state legislatures to pass laws banning cooperative, group-buying of telecoms services.

Comments

  1. With large or small markets, having people ‘commit’ to service prior to capitol being committed is an enormous boost to service providers. Without this vital cooperation, the service provider has only hints as to where the demand is….tower placement is critical and this cooperation helps in the actual network design.

    Add to that the cost of marketing to a small unknown segment and you can see why people find it hard to economically serve this segment. (this is complicated in smaller towns) By binding together the provider and the market in this way the marketing and capitol dollars are much more targeted, breakevens can be met sooner and customers can get service faster.

    Bill Stark
    President
    Excelsio Communications, Inc.